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HealthyHighway Blog

9 Brain Superfoods

 

Your brain controls every function in your body yet we rarely give it a  second thought.  And, few of us choose foods that protect or heal our  brain.  Here are some of the best foods for thought (literally):

1.  Spinach—More than Just for Popeye

A study of middle-aged rats fed diets with added spinach, strawberry extract,  or vitamin E for nine months found that spinach proved most potent in protecting  nerve cells against the effects of aging in two parts of the brain.  More  research needs to be done but it looks like Popeye was building more than  muscles when he ate spinach.

2.  Benefits of Blue for Grey Matter

Blueberries contain a group of plant nutrients called  proanthocyanidins.  Proanthocyanidins have a unique capacity to protect  both the watery and fatty parts of the brain against damage from some  environmental toxins.  Proanthocyanidins decrease free radical activity  within and between…

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Your Brain in the Future

Cutting-edge neuroscience has escaped from the lab and is suddenly showing up everywhere, changing the way we practice law, go shopping—even, possibly, fall in love.
By Tim Jarvis
It’s been only a decade or so since the world got hardwired, “Google” became a verb, and texting turned into a lifestyle. But if you’re still struggling to thumb a message, brace yourself: A whole new revolution in neuroscience is about to shake up our world.

“Just as information technology has affected everything from the way we do business to human communication,” says Zack Lynch, executive director of the Neurotechnology Industry Organization, “it will be the science of the brain that drives the fundamental changes of the future.” You can already see it starting to happen, and it may affect the way we spend our money, choose our mates, and punish criminals. It could even change our concepts of guilt and innocence.

Five other predictions on how brain science may change the way we live:

Neurolongevity
We will see cures or vaccines for diseases of the aging brain, says Judy Illes, PhD, professor of neurology and Canada research chair in neuroethics at the University of British Columbia. In fact, better insight into brain function in general will lead to interventions for many diseases and an overall longer life expectancy.

Neuroentertainment
Current technologies (such as video games) will merge with future ones (such as those involving neural feedback), so gamers might wear EEG-type caps that read their brainwaves and pick up their emotions. Conceivably, story lines would move forward in real time, the plot changing based on each person’s responses, says Zack Lynch, managing director of NeuroInsights, a market research and investment advisory firm.

Neuroeducation
The more we understand the neurobiology of learning—how the mind develops, what to make of differences between individual brains—the better we can “sculpt” teaching methods. Lynch predicts that educational software will be tailored to students’ individual brain patterns to improve math and language acquisition as well as creative thinking.

Neurofitness
Drugs and devices that stimulate the brain to augment our performance and mobility (so that we can run farther and faster, for example) will someday help everyone from Olympians to paraplegics, according to Illes.

Neurospirituality
New tools such as real-time fMRI technology, Lynch says, promise to accelerate our capacity to access deeply meditative and spiritual states.

 

Evolutionary_Mystic Post

We remember the admonition of our mothers: “Treat others as you want them to treat you.” But what if being nice was something we were inclined by nature to do anyway?

Renowned neuroscientist Donald Pfaff upends our entire understanding of ethics and social contracts with an intriguing proposition: the Golden Rule is hardwired into the human brain.

Pfaff, the researcher who first discovered the connections between specific brain circuits and certain behaviors, contends that the basic ethics governing our everyday lives can be traced directly to brain circuitry. Writing with popular science journalist Sandra J. Ackerman, he explains in this clear and concise account how specific brain signals induce us to consider our actions as if they were directed at ourselves—and subsequently lead us to treat others as we wish to be treated.

Brain hormones are a part of this complicated process, and The Neuroscience of Fair Play discusses how…

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Documentaries on Everything

I don’t know if this is common knowledge, but I’m as psyched as if I’d struck gold….what I’ve found is a site with reams of documentaries on all kinds of topics. So, I’ll list a few that are relevant to this blog:

Religion and Spirituality

The History of Angels

The Tibetan Book of the Dead: A Way of Life

Mysteries of the Bible

The Story of God

Psychology

Pleasure and Pain

Human Instinct

The Secret You – on human awareness

Brain Story

Somewhere in Between

Mystical Brain

Life After Life

Secrets of the Psychics

Mind you, (I just realized that) there are entire sections on Psychology, Philosophy, Religion, Science and Health on the site itself…so, enjoy…you know what I’ll be doing over the next while…:D

Great tips:)

Speed Learning Strategies

It will be cool to actually remember all the names of the people we meet or recite from memory all of the books that we have read. But not all people are blessed with a photographic memory that can capture a lot of data. The most that most people can do is to remember about 50 percent of the details in the books that they have read and recall about 10 names in the 50 people they meet. But hey, this does not mean that we should all give up wanting to make our memory better.

Although we cannot actually make our memory as powerful as one with a photographic memory, we can at least improve its processes so that we can recall more names than we usually do. This is especially true with people who are already aging. As we grow older, our memory slips. This is why most…

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