How to Slow Down Time

Another year over and you’re wondering where the time went? Well, although we can’t turn back time, here are a couple of tips on how to keep it from picking up speed as it goes by.

timeby Ronald E. Riggio, Ph.D

Why is it that time appears to go more quickly as we get older?

There are some recent books that tackle this psychological issue, and while there are a number of theories, the best explanation is that novel experiences seem to slow time perception down. Repetition of events seems to make them go faster…

I have written about time perception before, and readers have proposed some competing theories. One popular theory maintains that there is a sort of mathematical formula going on that divides our lifetime. As an 8-year-old child, a year is one-eighth of the lifetime – a significant (and memorable) portion; as a 50-year old, it’s only one-fiftieth. But that theory assumes that our brains work like computers, storing every single bit of information, like a filmed, life-long documentary. But that’s not how the brain works.

Perception and memory psychologists argue that memories are a social re-construction, not a literal record like computer files. Not every memory is stored as a distinct event, and the vast majority of our memories of places and times are not accessible.

Here’s [an] example: The first time you drive to a distant locale, it seems like it takes forever (remember that first weekend getaway, or commuting trip the first day of the new job?). As you repeat the drive, over and over, the time flies by, and you can’t recall any specific trip, unless something “memorable” happens. A really long traffic jam; a fender bender; etc. Or, the first day of a two-week beachside vacation seems to go on and on, a long, and enjoyable experience (“Wow, I’ve got two whole weeks of this!”). But before you know it, your packing for home.

So what is the key to time perception? Routine makes time go faster, unique and memorable events slow down time. Although there is comfort in routine, it does make time fly. So, if you want to “slow down” time… change the routine. Create unique experiences for each one. You can also engage in greater mindfulness – focusing on and savoring each passing moment. The old adage of “live for the moment” is the key to slowing down those quickly passing years.

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Great Tips on How to Think Your Way to Health

Turns out that how you think about your stressors has a great impact on your mental and physical health. This short video offers some tips on how to keep yourself healthy.

(Check out some of Dr.Evans’ other videos…one of my favorites is: 23 and 1/2 hours…it seems that 1/2 an hour of exercise, every day goes a long way to cure what ails you.)

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How to do what you need to do…:)

Drops of Awareness

As I was looking through my FaceBook updates, I noticed so many people sharing wonderful things we can, might, and should do to be happy, wealth, healthy, in pictures, poems and phrases.

Rarely, however, do I see the “HOW!” I see why and what to do, yet for myself, I’m interested in the HOW, when I am inspired or motivated.

How much ‘stop doing this and stop doing that’ can we manage?
When does it become time for action?

Okay, we get it. I get it. According to you,  I ‘should’ stop this or that. So let’s say I AGREE!I do want to make a change!  Now what? Cat got your tongue? Easy to say — people should and shouldn’t — but where’s the MEAT? Or the juicy bits of the orange (per my friend Olalah Njenga).

Here’s the 7 HOWs  — your first few ‘get…

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How to bring your intentions into the world of matter…

http://theheartofawakening.wordpress.com/2012/06/15/ – a guided meditation for this exploration. Thank you, Beth.

The Heart of Awakening

“For the last four hundred years, an unstated assumption of science is that human intention cannot affect what we call “physical reality. Our experimental research of the past decade shows that, for today’s world and under the right conditions, this assumption is no longer correct. We humans are much more than we think we are…” – Dr. William A. Tiller

We have come to a place where science and spirituality meet in many ways. For those who have had a focus on energy, whether through Acupuncture or Eastern Medicine, Energy Healing such as Reiki or Pranic Healing, Yoga or other spiritual practices, it has long been accepted that matter follows energy. It is exciting that science is now on board with this concept. A major focus on the Heart of Awakening blog is to support a shift into a new paradigm. This begins with an inner shift in our thoughts…

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meditation as treatment for addiction, anxiety…

Read Think Write Teach

Physicians Explain How Stress, 12-Step Programs Change the Brain

When Bill W. and Dr. Bob created Alcoholics Anonymous 77 years ago, they borrowed principles learned from a Christian fellowship called the Oxford Group to create their 12-step recovery program.

“They knew that their spiritual program was effective where other ‘cures’ had failed, and over the years, there have been many theories as to why,” says Dr. Harry Haroutunian, physician director of the Betty Ford Center in Palm Springs, and collaborator with Dr. Louis Teresi on the book, Hijacking the Brain: How Drug and Alcohol Addiction Hijacks our Brains – The Science Behind Twelve-Step Recovery (www.HijackingTheBrain.com).

“Now we know that stress is the fuel that feeds addiction, and that stress and drug and alcohol use cause neurological and physiological changes,” Haroutunian says. “The changes are primarily in the deep brain reward centers, the limbic brain, responsible for decisions, memory…

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Neuroplasticity and Meditation

The more you think about things, the more you think about things.

Introduction to NeuroplasticityDr. Rick Hanson – You Can Change Your Brain, Meditation Hope for Mental Health, Meditation Changes the Brain, And Relax…..Why Meditation Could Boost Your Health, The Neurobiology of “We”

Changing Your Mind – A CBC Documentary 

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