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HealthyHighway Blog

9 Brain Superfoods

 

Your brain controls every function in your body yet we rarely give it a  second thought.  And, few of us choose foods that protect or heal our  brain.  Here are some of the best foods for thought (literally):

1.  Spinach—More than Just for Popeye

A study of middle-aged rats fed diets with added spinach, strawberry extract,  or vitamin E for nine months found that spinach proved most potent in protecting  nerve cells against the effects of aging in two parts of the brain.  More  research needs to be done but it looks like Popeye was building more than  muscles when he ate spinach.

2.  Benefits of Blue for Grey Matter

Blueberries contain a group of plant nutrients called  proanthocyanidins.  Proanthocyanidins have a unique capacity to protect  both the watery and fatty parts of the brain against damage from some  environmental toxins.  Proanthocyanidins decrease free radical activity  within and between…

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How to Slow Down Time

Another year over and you’re wondering where the time went? Well, although we can’t turn back time, here are a couple of tips on how to keep it from picking up speed as it goes by.

timeby Ronald E. Riggio, Ph.D

Why is it that time appears to go more quickly as we get older?

There are some recent books that tackle this psychological issue, and while there are a number of theories, the best explanation is that novel experiences seem to slow time perception down. Repetition of events seems to make them go faster…

I have written about time perception before, and readers have proposed some competing theories. One popular theory maintains that there is a sort of mathematical formula going on that divides our lifetime. As an 8-year-old child, a year is one-eighth of the lifetime – a significant (and memorable) portion; as a 50-year old, it’s only one-fiftieth. But that theory assumes that our brains work like computers, storing every single bit of information, like a filmed, life-long documentary. But that’s not how the brain works.

Perception and memory psychologists argue that memories are a social re-construction, not a literal record like computer files. Not every memory is stored as a distinct event, and the vast majority of our memories of places and times are not accessible.

Here’s [an] example: The first time you drive to a distant locale, it seems like it takes forever (remember that first weekend getaway, or commuting trip the first day of the new job?). As you repeat the drive, over and over, the time flies by, and you can’t recall any specific trip, unless something “memorable” happens. A really long traffic jam; a fender bender; etc. Or, the first day of a two-week beachside vacation seems to go on and on, a long, and enjoyable experience (“Wow, I’ve got two whole weeks of this!”). But before you know it, your packing for home.

So what is the key to time perception? Routine makes time go faster, unique and memorable events slow down time. Although there is comfort in routine, it does make time fly. So, if you want to “slow down” time… change the routine. Create unique experiences for each one. You can also engage in greater mindfulness – focusing on and savoring each passing moment. The old adage of “live for the moment” is the key to slowing down those quickly passing years.

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The health benefits of art…:)

Ignite Your Life Though Action

My recent travels into researching therapies to help a friend recover from a stroke have yielded some interesting results. Art appreciation was recommended by research conducted at the University Tor Vergata School of Nursing in Rome. Compared were stroke survivors who enjoyed art and their quality of life after a stroke and those who did not. The numbers from the 192 study participants were a fairly equal split. Art in this study was described as music, painting, theatre. Recovery outcome for art lovers was described as:

“…of positive physical and mental health benefits. They had more energy, better general health and improved mobility. They were also happier, less anxious or depressed and had better memory and communication skills”.

If this does not sound positive enough, lead author Dr. Ercole Vellone, assistant professor in nursing science at the University Tor Vergata, said:

“The results underscore the value of lifelong exposure to…

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Great tips:)

Speed Learning Strategies

It will be cool to actually remember all the names of the people we meet or recite from memory all of the books that we have read. But not all people are blessed with a photographic memory that can capture a lot of data. The most that most people can do is to remember about 50 percent of the details in the books that they have read and recall about 10 names in the 50 people they meet. But hey, this does not mean that we should all give up wanting to make our memory better.

Although we cannot actually make our memory as powerful as one with a photographic memory, we can at least improve its processes so that we can recall more names than we usually do. This is especially true with people who are already aging. As we grow older, our memory slips. This is why most…

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Sleep

Sleep Can Sharpen Your Memory, Help! I Can’t Sleep Because I Overthink, Abdominal Breathing for Good Yoga Sleep, Lucid Dreaming, Want to Lose Weight, Get More Sleep, How Healthy Foods Can Get You a Deep Sleep, Learn While You Sleep? Memory Reactivated, How to Sleep at Work, Sleeping Beauty – tips for better sleep, Three Ways to Be Happy – sleep your way to happiness, Improve Your Sleep to Improve Your Health, Beauty of Rest – a poem, Sleep Power – allow yourself to rest, Sleep…We All Want It and Need It – sleep and children, Hypnosis for Sleep, The Sleeper’s Dilemma

Picture credit: Facebook